University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000
RIVER LIFE

Climate Change, the “Third Pole,” and Minnesota’s Rivers

December 8, 2009Patrick NunnallyRivers2

By now, most readers of this blog probably know that world leaders are meeting in Copenhagen to try to develop international accords on what to do regarding climate change. Certainly important work, but what’s it got to do with those of us who spend our time working toward a sustainable Mississippi River and its watershed?

Well, a lot, actually, but I’ll only focus on three of the many threads of this discussion today. In the Time magazine dated December 7,  there is a report about glaciers melting in the Himalayas, a region sometimes referred to as the world’s “third pole.” These glaciers feed some of the most significant rivers of the world, including the Indus, the Ganges, the Brahmaputra, the Mekong, the Yellow, the Yangtze. All in all, the glaciers of the Himilayas and the Tibetan Plateau serve the water needs of billions of people: “the water tower of Asia.”

But the water tower is not refilling as it once did. precise measurements are difficult to obtain owing to the difficult and contested terrain, but anecdotal and observational evidence indicates that the glaciers are shrinking. If they recede to the point where the water supply of these great river systems becomes unreliable, present stresses on water supply and distribution may grow to the point of catastrophe.

But we may not be able to look to the Copenhagen discussions for help on this particular concern. Writing in the op-ed section of the Los Angeles Times James G. Workman argues that Copenhagen delegates have essentially “dehydrated” the discussions by removing water from a central point in the negotiations. Quite honestly, I don’t know enough detail about the Copenhagen agenda to support or question Workman’s argument (and welcome comment from people more versed than I) but the issue bears further consideration.

Fortunately, that consideration is happening in Minnesota. Working with a grant from the Legislative-Citizens’ Commission on Minnesota Resources, the University’s Water Resources Center and its co-director Professor Deborah Swackhamer are coordinating the development of a 25 year plan to manage Minnesota’s water resources. We usually think of Minnesota, the “Land of 10,000 Lakes” and the intersection of three continental watersheds (the Mississippi, the Great lakes, and the Red River/Hudson’s Bay system) as having plenty of water. Maybe we do, maybe we don’t; no one really knows for sure. Nor do we know precisely where state policies are in conflict or leave gaps in directing the management of state surface and groundwater.

In 2008, voters passed the Clean Water, Land, and Legacy Amendment, which raises millions of dollars every year for water conservation, habitat and natural area preservation, and programs that protect the state’s historic and cultural resources. The kind of detailed inventory and analysis that Swackhamer and her team are undertaking will go a long way in directing lawmakers how to use those funds wisely so that, we hope, we aren’t facing the drying up of our own “water tower of North America,” the Mississippi River.

Image is of Gaumuk Glacier, the source of the Ganges River in the Himalayas.
Image Courtesy of Hug Cirici, used under a Creative Commons License
http://www.flickr.com/photos/huggy47/2593119292/

Tagged , ,

Related Posts

2 Comments

  1. Joanne RichardsonDecember 8, 2009 at 11:47 am

    You might also be interested in this recently published graphic illustrating the major opposing viewpoints (though giving them even balance) in the climate change debate: http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/climate-change-deniers-vs-the-consensus/

  2. Joanne RichardsonDecember 21, 2009 at 11:33 am

    Here is another interesting and relevant article discussing the possibility that black soot is causing/contributing to the melting of the Third Pole. http://www.livescience.com/environment/091214-black-carbon-himalaya-glacier.html

Contact Us!
Send us a note at rvrlife@umn.edu to make suggestions for other places we should look, media to track, and stories to tell!
River Life in Video
Come Along for a Water Walk with Kare11 and River Life, and see Gifts at Work: The Mississippi River by the University of Minnesota Foundation
Open Rivers: Rethinking the Mississippi
A joint project of River Life, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the University of Minnesota Libraries, Open Rivers is an interdisciplinary online journal that recognizes the Mississippi River as a space for timely and critical conversations about people, community, water, and place.