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What Can Be Ironic About Asian Carp?

April 21, 2014Patrick NunnallyFormer Featured Posts, Program & AnnouncementsComments Off on What Can Be Ironic About Asian Carp?

Leaping Silver CarpI’m guessing it was about 25-30 years ago (think David Letterman in his early “Late Show” snarkiness) when it seemed that irony would be the trope that defined the age.  Whatever came along, there was a smart-aleck putdown, a side comment, a mocking dismissal, all of which served to establish superiority of the mocker over the mockee.

Some called this “irony”: I’m not so sure, seemed pretty sophomoric to me.  Thinking like the English major that I was then, irony was more along the lines of “whoa, didn’t see that coming,” most especially when the unexpected turn of events led to a whole new perspective on the subject at hand.

It’s that “whole new perspective” thing that is what’s “ironic” about our “Irony of Carp” program.  We are not at all suggesting that the invasive carps are not a serious issue, and we are not looking for laughs here either.  The intent of our program is to leave the audience reflecting “I never thought of it that way before.  Maybe I should look into this further.”

I think that’s one of our jobs at a university, to invite people to think more broadly and more deeply than they might otherwise.  Brian Ickes, from whom we borrowed the title to the program, certainly does so with his featured talk.  Our panel will be likewise provocative.  What might we mean by “resilience,” a term that is thrown around pretty loosely these days?  When we say the carp are going to destroy the “natural” processes of the river, we know what we mean by “nature,” right?  Clearly, community engagement is simply a matter of rallying the public to take advocacy action.

Or is it?  We feel that these assumptions and questions should be asked, and that robust conversation about them along with direct advocacy action is what’s necessary to rally our communities to address our changing river, and water, issues.

Of course another part of our university responsibility is providing access to reliable information.  If your reflection in the issues associated with carps has you hungry for more information, you might start with these web sites:

We’ll pick up the issue from time to time, of course, but with so many other first rate sources of information, we’re just as likely to be reporting on what they have as contributing new insights ourselves.  Still, we’ll post something from the “Irony of Carp” session, just to say we did.

(Bad effort at ’80s dismissive attitude there, closing the loop to the top of the post!)

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