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RIVER LIFE

“Water Is All We Have”

October 27, 2014Patrick NunnallyFormer Featured PostsComments Off on “Water Is All We Have”

And in Minnesota, we have plenty–or so we think.  More on that another time, perhaps.

In fact, though, most of us don’t know very much about the water we drink.  We know it comes from some place beyond our house or office, and that it goes some place away from our house or office.  When pressed, we can probably come up with the name of a nearby stream or river as the source of our drinking water.  Sometimes we’d be right.

The artists at Works Progress studio have recently been investigating tap water as an “ecological, emotional, civic, and socio-economic moment–a common experience that opens space for conversation about our relationships with water and water systems.”

The resulting project is “Water Bar,” a physical installation akin to a bar, where water is what is served, usually in “flights” of small glasses, like the “tasting menu” at a place that serves fancy beer or wine.  Here, as the pun over the bar says, “water is all we have,” but the conversations about that water–where it comes from, how it’s treated, who has access, who manages it–serve up a very rich experience indeed.

Learn more about Water Bar at this guest blog written by the artists, Shanai Matteson and Colin Kloecker, hosted at the blog of the Mississippi River Fund.

 

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