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A Sip of Science: Indigenous People and Plant Genetics

February 4, 2015Patrick NunnallyEvents, Former Featured PostsComments Off on A Sip of Science: Indigenous People and Plant Genetics

We tend to have many prejudices and assumptions about both parts of next week’s talk, that is, indigenous people and genetically modified plants.  Come to A Sip of Science at the Aster Cafe on Thursday February 12 (note changed date) to hear Prof. Clint Carroll, American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota, on these subjects.  Full announcement follows below:

A SIP OF SCIENCE – PLEASE NOTE CHANGED DATE!
From Mother Corn to GMO: Indigenous Peoples and Plant Genetics
Clint Carroll, American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota

THURSDAY, February 12th, 2015  5:30p.m.  
Aster Cafe125 SE Main Street, St. Anthony Main, Minneapolis
No cover, Please RSVP!

 

A SIP OF SCIENCE bridges the gap between science and culture in a setting that bridges the gap between brain and belly.  Food, beer, and learning are on the menu in a happy hour forum that puts science in context through storytelling.

February 12th Event –

Humans have modified food crops to produce desirable traits since the birth of agriculture, but today this modification mainly occurs at a plant’s genetic level. The ever-growing prominence of genetically modified (GM) foods, and the debates they have sparked, are an unavoidable part of our lives today. But what are the implications of this increasing amount of technology involved in food production—including the patenting and commodification of genetically modified crops—for, specifically, American Indian peoples? How do biopatenting standards privilege certain forms of modification over others? How might a concept like “food sovereignty” work to heal American Indian communities and decrease colonial dependency? Join us as Dr. Clint Carroll addresses these questions and more through indigenous perspectives on intellectual and cultural property, and the recent indigenous traditional food movement.

 

The talk takes place during happy hour at the Aster Cafe || Food and Drink Available for Purchase

ABOUT THIS MONTH’S SPEAKER

Clint Carroll is an assistant professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. He holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy and Management from the University of California-Berkeley and a B.A. in Anthropology and American Indian Studies from the University of Arizona. Clint is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and works closely with his tribal community on issues of environmental policy and cultural revitalization. His forthcoming book, Roots of Our Renewal: Ethnobotany and Cherokee Environmental Governance (University of Minnesota Press, Spring 2015), situates this work in the context of broader discussions of tribal governance and political ecology. He teaches courses on American Indian ecological perspectives and environmental issues.

 

ABOUT A SIP OF SCIENCE

A SIP OF SCIENCE is a science happy hour sponsored by the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED). It is a chance to hear about new and exciting research over beer, in a cool bar.  Come talk with the experts about their efforts to address some of the Earth’s most pressing problems. NCED’s A SIP OF SCIENCE brings the wonder of science to happy hour.

Get more information at: http://www.nced.umn.edu/content/sip-of-science

 

 

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